RELIG 380X
CATHOLIC SOCIAL THOUGHT

 

http://www.public.iastate.edu/~jdonaghy/CatholicSocialThought.html

Instructor: Dr. John Donaghy

E-mail: jdonaghy@iastate.edu

 

 

 

     This course will treat the tradition of Catholic Social Thought, concentrating on the movements, church documents, and Catholic theologians and activists who have been developing this body of thought from the late 1800s.

     The course will provide a critical analysis of texts from church leaders, theologians, and activists in the context of contemporary issues and Catholic social movements. This analysis will provide insight into the development of Catholic social thought on a wide variety of political, economic, and social issues, including agricultural issues.

_____________________________________________________________

 

REQUIRED TEXTS:

Fred Kammer, S. J., Doing Faithjustice: An Introduction to Catholic Social Thought. Revised Edition. Paulist Press, 2004. (ISBN 0-8091-4227-9)

Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church. United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2004 (ISBN 1-57455-692-4) Available on-line at <http://www.vatican.va/roman_curia/pontifical_councils/justpeace/documents/rc_pc_justpeace_doc_20060526_compendio-dott-soc_en.html>

Jon Sobrino, Where Is God? Earthquake, Terrorism, Barbarity and Hope. Orbis Books, 2004. (ISBN 1-57075-566-3)

                                                                             

BASIC ON-LINE RESOURCES:

     Office for Social Justice, Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis, “Catholic Social Teaching; Major Documents”

                http://www.osjspm.org/catholic_social_teaching.aspx

Spring Hill College, Theology Department, “Theology Library”

      http://www.shc.edu/theolibrary/

     Busy Persons’ Guide to Catholic Social Teaching

           http://salt.claretianpubs.org/cstline/tline.html

     Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, The Social Agenda: A Collection of Magisterial Texts

 http://www.thesocialagenda.org/

                                                   

MAJOR REFERENCE SOURCES:

     Judith A. Dwyer, ed., The New Dictionary of Catholic Social Thought.  Collegeville, MN: Michael Glazier, 1994. (On reserve in ISU library)

  Marvin L. Krier Mich, Catholic Social Teaching and Movements. Twenty-Third Publications, 1998. (On reserve in ISU library)

  David J. O’Brien & Thomas A. Shannon, ed., Catholic Social Thought: The Documentary Heritage. Orbis Books, 1992. (On reserve in ISU library)

  DeBerri, Edward P., James Hug, with Peter J. Henriot, & Michael J. Schulteis, Catholic Social Teaching: Our Best Kept Secret. Fourth Revised and Expanded Edition. Orbis Books, 2003. (On reserve in ISU library)

  Donal Door, Option for the Poor: A Hundred Years of Catholic Social Teaching. Revised Edition. Orbis Books, 1992. (On reserve in ISU library)

    


COURSE OUTLINE

Topics and readings

 

            You are expected to read the primary readings before each class and be ready to discuss the ideas in those readings. For some classes there are recommended readings; these are optional unless you are part of the group responsible for a presentation during that class.

 

For some classes there is a representative figure; these are optional unless you are part of the group that is responsible for a presentation fro that class. However, some basic knowledge of the figures is recommended for examinations.

 

You may find some questions to help you focus your reading at http://www.public.iastate.edu/~jdonaghy/CSTstudy1-11.html.

 

Please note that the notation for readings at times refer to paragraphs or sections of documents. You are not expected to read the entire document. Most of the official documents can be found at http://www.osjspm.org/social_teaching_documents.aspx.

 

 

     1.   Introduction to Catholic Social Thought

                       Introductions and requirements

               Framework of the course

               Religion and culture and politics

               Catholic social thought, teaching, or doctrine?

                  Sources for Catholic social thought

                  Authority of CST church documents:                              

               The place of Catholic social thought in Catholic thought

               Key aspects of Catholicism:

                  Catholicity (universality), community, sacramentality, mediation

               Root Metaphors in Catholic Social Thought:

                  The invisible handshake (instead of the invisible hand)

                  The House of Love – in a redemptive sense (instead of the house of fear)

                  The earth as more than matter and more than a sacred space: where God is present

                  Pentecost (instead of Babel)

 

     2.  Roots of Catholic Social Thought 1

          Jewish Scriptures: Creation, Stewardship, Covenant, Prophets

                *Kammer, Doing Faithjustice, pp. 1-7, 9 – 39

                *U.S. Catholic Bishops, Economic Justice for All, ¶¶ 28-40

                   http://www.osjspm.org/economic_justice_for_all.aspx

 

     3. Roots of Catholic Social Thought 2

                    Christian Scriptures: Jesus and the Reign of God

             Kammer, Doing Faithjustice, pp. 40 – 54

               Framing of Scriptures from official sources:

             Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church, ¶¶ 20-33

             U.S. Catholic Bishops, Economic Justice for All, “The Christian View of Economic Life.” ¶¶ 41-60

                   http://www.osjspm.org/economic_justice_for_all.aspx

 

     4. History of Catholic Social Thought 1

               Roots in the tradition

               Some key  aspects of Catholic moral thought:

                  natural law, relation of ends and means, effects and consequences

          Justice defined (Commutative, Distributive, Legal/Social/Participative

             Kammer, Doing Faithjustice, pp. 65-78

             Compendium, ¶¶ 201-203

             U. S. Catholic Bishops, Economic Justice for All, ¶¶ 68-76

                   http://www.osjspm.org/economic_justice_for_all.aspx

 

     5.   History of Catholic Social Thought 2

                       Historical documents, 1891-present

                   Kammer, Doing Faithjustice, pp. 79-141

                        Compendium,  ¶¶ 87 – 104

 

Each student will sign up for one of the classic documents of Catholic Social Teaching  and give a short presentation and a two page paper on the document in classes 5 - 7. Use the resources in Kammer, The Compendium, The New Dictionary of Catholic Social Thought,  and The Busy Persons’ Guide to Catholic Social Teaching.

 

               Documents treated:

a.     Rerum Novarum

b.     Quadragesimo Anno

c.     Mater et Magistra

d.     Pacem in Terris

e.     Gaudium et Spes

f.      Populorum Progressio

 

     6.   History of Catholic Social Thought 3

               Continuation from last class

                     Documents treated:

a.     Medellín documents

b.     Justice in the World

c.     Octagesimo Adveniens

d.     Evangelii Nuntiandi

e.     Puebla documents

f.      Laborem Exercens

g.     Challenge of Peace

 

     7.   History of Catholic Social Thought 4

               Continuation from last class

                 Documents treated:

a.     Solicitudo Rei Socialis

b.   Economic Justice for All

c.    Centesimus Annus

d.  Evangelium Vitae

e.   Deus Caritas Est

 

     8. Principles of Catholic Social Thought 1: Common Good, Universal Destination of Goods, Subsidiarity

                  Compendium ¶¶ 160-163

Common Good, Compendium ¶¶ 164-170; John XXIII, Pacem in Terris  ¶¶ 136-138.

Universal Destination of Goods, Compendium ¶¶ 171-184; Paul VI, Populorum Progressio ¶¶ 22-24.

Subsidiarity, Compendium ¶¶ 185-188

                  Recommended supplemental readings:

                     Honduran Bishops, “Por los caminos de esperanza” (in Spanish)

                     http://www.celam.org/noticelam/noticias2006/agencias/9175.htm               
US Conference of Catholic Bishops, Faithful Citizenship

                        http://www.usccb.org/faithfulcitizenship/bishopStatement.html

 

 10. Principles of Catholic Social Thought 2: Human Rights, Human Dignity, Participation, Solidarity, Option for the Poor

                  Representative figure: Oscar Romero

John Dear, “Oscar Romero, 25 Years Later”

http://www.fatherjohndear.org/articles/romero25.htm

Human Rights,  Pacem in Terris, ¶¶ 8-30

Participation, Compendium ¶¶ 189-191

Solidarity, Compendium ¶¶ 191-196

               Option for the Poor       

Representative figure: Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker

Jim Forest, “A Harsh and Dreadful Love: Dorothy Day’s Witness to the Gospel”

http://incommunion.org/forest-flier/jimsessays/a-harsh-and-dreadful-love/

or John Donaghy, “Dorothy Day: a review lecture of Robert Coles’ book”

http://www.public.iastate.edu/~jdonaghy/Dorothy_Day.html

Compendium ¶¶ 183-184

Economic Justice for All, ¶¶ 48-52, 85-92,

Gustavo Gutiérrez, “Renewing the Option for the Poor,” in David Batstone, Eduardo Mendieta, Lois Ann Lorentzen, & Dwight Hopkins, ed., Liberation Theologies, Postmodernity, and the Americas (London: Routledge, 1997): 69-82. (On e-reserve)

 

 

     11. EXAMINATION 1

 

30%           Explain one of the following

                              Sabbath, Jubilee, Jubilee year, Reign of God

 

20%           Identify and explain the three forms of justice 

 

50%     Find a news story, an editorial, an op-ed piece. Identify concepts, principles, ideas that are raised in the documents that have relevance to the story. You do not have to solve the problem or develop a full critique; you need to show the relevance of Catholic Social Thought to the piece chosen.

 

     12. Poverty 1

                       Kammer, pp. 142-189

                  Poverty USA- http://www.povertyusa.org/

 

     13. Poverty 2

                  Speaker on local poverty

                     Kammer, pp. 142-189

    

     14. Economy 1: Economic justice and Empowerment

                  Justice and Charity; economic justice

                        Kammer, pp. 190-222

         Compendium ¶¶ 323-376

      Catholic Campaign for Human Development –

            http://www.usccb.org/cchd

             In class video: “Helping People Help Themselves.” (15 minutes)

Recommended case study:

Wendy Tyndale, “National Forum of Fish Workers: a spiritually inspired movement for alternative development”

      http://www.wfdd.org.uk/programmes/case_studies/fishworkers.pdf

 

     15. Economy 2: Agriculture

Evans, Bernard, “Agriculture and Catholic Social Teaching: Elements of an Agricultural Ethic,” Catholic Rural Life 43:2 (Spring 2001): 12, 14-17. (On e-reserve)

United States Conference of Catholic bishops, "For I Was Hungry and You Gave Me Food" (Mt 25:35): Catholic Reflections on Food, Farmers, and Farmworkers, Pastoral Reflection: V. Responding in Faith, Criteria for Agricultural Policy and Advocacy

                              http://www.usccb.org/bishops/agricultural.shtml

 

     16. Work 1

                  Representative figure:  Msgr. George Higgins

Charles E. Curran, “Farewell: George G. Higgins, R.I.P.”, Commonweal, May 17, 2002

http://www.commonwealmagazine.org/article.php3?id_article=525

                  THE NATURE OF WORK

                     Compendium, ¶¶ 255-322

                     John Paul II, Laborem Exercens: On Human Work, ¶¶ 4, 15, 25

             http://www.osjspm.org/majordoc_laborem_exercens_official_text.aspx

          U S Catholic Bishops, Economic Justice for All, #97

       LABOR UNIONS

             Compendium, ¶¶ 305-308

         Laborem Exercens  ¶¶ 8, 20

 

     17. Work 2: Living Wage

Documents:

National Catholic War Council, Program of Social Reconstruction, ¶¶ 25, 35, 37, 40.

   http://www.osjspm.org/majordoc_us_bishops_statements_program_of_social_reconstruction.aspx             

Compendium, ¶¶ 250

Ryan, John A., “The Minimum of Justice: A Living Wage,” in John A. Ryan, Economic Justice. (Westminster John Knox Press, 1996): 112-125. (On e-reserve)

John Paul II, Laborem Exercens: On Human Work, ¶ 19

Leo XIII, Rerum Novarum, ¶¶ 61 - 63, 65.

Pius XI, Quadragesimo Anno, ¶¶ 66, 70-72.

Bill Quigley, “The Living Wage Movement,” Blueprint for Social Justice, Volume LIV, No. 9  (May, 2001) http://www.loyno.edu/twomey/blueprint/vol_liv/No-09_May_2001.html

                  Recommended Case Study:

                     League of Women Voters of Ames, Report on Living Wage

                        http://www.ames.ia.lwvnet.org/files/LIVINGWAGESTUDYREPORT.pdf

                                                                       

   18. Immigration 1

                     Representative figure: Bartolomé de las Casas

Brian Pierce, “Bartolomé de las Casas and Truth: Toward a Spirituality of Solidarity,” Spirituality Today  44: #1 (Spring 1992), pp. 4-19.

                              http://www.spiritualitytoday.org/spir2day/92441pierce.html

Document: Strangers No Longer: Together on the Journey of Hope: A Pastoral Letter Concerning Migration from the Catholic Bishops of Mexico and the United States

http://www.nccbuscc.org/mrs/stranger.htm

Video: Dying to Live: A Migrant’s Journey

 

   19. Immigration 2

                        Justice for Immigrants web-site

                              http://www.justiceforimmigrants.org

Mary Ann Glendon, “Principled immigration,” First Things, 164 (June/July 2006): 23-26.

                              http://www.firstthings.com/ftissues/ft0606/articles/glendon.html

 

     20. Examination 2

 

   21. The Consistent Ethic of Life

   CAPITAL PUNISHMENT

         Campaign:

             Catholic Campaign to End the Use of the Death Penalty

                http://www.usccb.org/sdwp/national/deathpenalty/

          Documents:

            US Conference of Catholic Bishops, A Culture of life and the Penalty of Death

               http://www.usccb.org/sdwp/national/penaltyofdeath.pdf

             John Paul II, Evangelium Vitae: The Gospel of Life ¶¶ 27, 40, 52-56

                http://www.osjspm.org/majordoc_evengelium_vitae_official_text.aspx                                                                       

                         or

            http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/john_paul_ii/encyclicals/documents/hf_jp-ii_enc_25031995_evangelium-vitae_en.html

                   Video: A Culture of Life and the Penalty of Death

 

     22. War and Peace 1: Just War Theory

Representative figure: Franz Jaegerstaetter

Erna Putz, “Against the Stream: Franz Jägerstätter, the man who refused to fight for Hitler”

http://www.c3.hu/%7ebocs/jager-a.htm

Compendium, ¶¶ 488-508

National Conference of Catholic Bishops, The Harvest of Justice Is Sown in Peace (1993): Section I. Theology, Spirituality and Ethics for Peacemaking

http://www.usccb.org/sdwp/harvest.htm

Gregory M. Reichberg, “Preemptive War: What would Aquinas say?” Commonweal, January 30, 2004

                             http://www.commonwealmagazine.org/article.php?id_article=831

 

     23. War and Peace 2: Nonviolence

Representative figure: Thomas Merton

Jim Forest, “Foreword” to Peace in the Post-Christian Era by Thomas Merton

                              http://incommunion.org/forest-flier/jimsessays/foreword-merton/

Thomas Merton, “Blessed are the meek: The Christian Roots of Nonviolence”

                              http://www.forusa.org/nonviolence/40merton.html

Catholic Peace Fellowship staff, “On the (Mis)use of Scripture for War,” Sign of Peace III, #2 (Summer 2004)

http://www.catholicpeacefellowship.org/print.asp?m=2066

or

http://www.catholicpeacefellowship.org/downloads/scrip_and_war.pdf

Video: Where There Is Hatred

 

     24. War and Peace 3: CASE STUDY: The war in Iraq

Bishop Wenski, USCCB, “Toward a Responsible Transition in Iraq”

                        http://www.usccb.org/sdwp/international/iraqstatement0106.htm

Richard John Neuhaus, “War and Moral Judgment,” First Things October 2005

                            http://www.firstthings.com/ftissues/ft0510/public.html

Michael J. Baxter, “ ‘One Nation Under God’ - Richard J. Neuhaus in Time of War,” Houston Catholic Worker, Vol. XXV, No. 1, Jan.-Feb. 2005.

                            http://www.cjd.org/paper/neuhaus.html

 

     25. Environment

Representative figure: St. Francis of Assisi

                        http://conservation.catholic.org/st__francis_of_assisi.htm

                  Compendium, pp. 197-211

Pope John Paul II, Peace with God the Creator, Peace with All of Creation. World Day of Peace Message, 1990.

http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/john_paul_ii/messages/peace/documents/hf_jp-ii_mes_19891208_xxiii-world-day-for-peace_en.html

 

     26. A contemporary liberation theological reflection on current issues.

                            Jon Sobrino, Where Is God? Earthquake, Terrorism, Barbarity and Hope.

                                    Sobrino, pp. 1 – 48

 

     27. A contemporary liberation theological reflection on current issues.

                                    Sobrino, pp. 49-105

 

     28. A contemporary liberation theological reflection on current issues.

                                    Sobrino, pp. 106-152, vii-xxi

 

     29. A contemporary liberation theological reflection on current issues.

 

     30. Evaluation, last thoughts


 

 

REQUIREMENTS

 

PARTICIPATION (15%)                                        

Students are expected to attend all classes. More than four absences will result in a lowering of your grade. Participation in the class also means being prepared. Students are expected to have read the required texts assigned for each class.

 

INTERVIEW  (5%)

Each student is required to schedule a fifteen minute interview with the professor before October 1. This is an easy 5% of your grade.

 

EXAMINATIONS (30%)

     Class 9  (10%)

     Class 20 (10%)

     Final examination (10%)

 

SHORT PAPERS (10%)

     One three minute class presentation and two page report on one of official documents of Catholic Social Thought. Due September 5, 7, or 12. (5%)

     A two page description of the work of a group that reflects CST from the list of organizations and campaigns provided below. Due October 15. (5%)

 

OUTSIDE CLASS PROJECT (10%)

     You have several options. This project must be completed with the report handed in by November 30.

           Attend an approved lecture and write a three page reflection paper.

           Do a service project at an approved site and write a three page reflection paper.

           View one of the recommended films noted below and write a three page reflection paper.

                  Romero, Entertaining Angels, On the Waterfront, Dead Man Walking, The Mission, Sophie Scholl, Cry Freedom, Amen, Gandhi, Hotel Rwanda, The Milagro Bean Field War, Constant Gardener, Lord of War.

 

GROUP PROJECT (10%)

      Groups of three or four students will make a joint presentation on the issue/case which is treated in the classes and each student will hand in a three page paper. Sign up for these by the third week of class. 

      Topics will include Agriculture, Living Wage, Immigration, Capital Punishment, and Just War.

 

MAJOR PAPER: 10-12 pages (20%)                                                                                 

This paper should be a major analysis of a principle or issue treated in Catholic Social Teaching. Each student is urged (but not required) to examine an issue related to his or her field of studies or projected career. This paper should show your understanding of Catholic social thought and your ability to use it as an instrument of analysis. A critique of a dimension of Catholic social thought is fine, but a critique must be accompanied by a fair treatment of the dimension critiqued. References will be suggested by the professor. Papers must reflect some familiarity with the suggested references.

      An initial one page description of the issue you are interested in is due by the fifth week of classes. Send by e-mail.

      An initial bibliography is due by October 19 . The bibliography should contain specific references to at least two church documents and at least five articles, at least two of which must not be web-based articles. Students are expected to consult our text Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church as well as Judith A. Dwyer, ed., The New Dictionary of Catholic Social Thought. These reference works will in most cases greatly help in the elaboration of your topic and your paper.

A first draft may be handed in early for comments. This is not mandatory.

The final paper must be handed in during the 14th week of classes.

     Students who wish an alternative project must discuss this with the professor by the fourth week of classes. Alternatives include service learning projects, posters, audio-visual presentations, advocacy projects.

 

Possible topic areas include, but are not limited to:


     Catholic politicians and Catholic teaching

     The living wage

     Labor unions: their role in CST

     Consistent Ethic of Life

     Liberation theology in Latin America

     Liberation theology in Africa

     Globalization and CST

     Free Trade agreements and CST

     Community Organizing and CST

     Catholic Relief Services and CST

     The Catholic Campaign for Human Development

     Global Warming and CST

     Consumerism

     Social Responsibility in Investments

     Can a Catholic work for the Pentagon?

     Work place ethics

     Beyond Liberal and Conservative

     Catholic Critique of Capitalism    

     Racism

     Anti-Semitism

     The Holocaust and Catholic responses

     Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker Movement

     Business in light of Catholic Social Thought

     Genetically-engineered food and CST

     Access to water and CST

     Privatization and CST

     Land reform

     Humanitarian intervention

     Revolution

     Nonviolence in practice

     Justice and Peace in the Holy Land


           These suggestions are meant as areas that might be researched for a paper; however, your paper will generally need to be narrowed down since these areas are quite broad. You might also take a specific event and analyze it in light of Catholic Social Thought, e.g., Darfur. Or you might analyze the work of a specific author in the area of Catholic Social Thought, e.g., Gustavo Gutiérrez, John Ryan, John Courtney Murray, Dorothy Day.

 

 

PROFESSIONAL INTEGRITY

         Personal ethics and academic integrity demand that assignments are one’s own work and not taken from another source.

         Academic Misconduct in any form is in violation of Iowa State University Student Disciplinary Regulations and will not be tolerated.  This includes, but is not limited to: copying or sharing answers on tests or assignments, plagiarism, and having someone else do your academic work.  Depending on the act, a student could receive an F grade on the test/assignment, F grade for the course, and could be suspended or expelled from the University.  See the Conduct Code at http://www.dso.iastate.edu/ja for more details and a full explanation of the Academic Misconduct policies.

 

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

Please address any special needs or special accommodations with me at the beginning of the semester or as soon as you become aware of your needs.

 

 

Organizations

     Catholic Campaign for Human Development

           http://www.usccb.org/cchd

     Catholic Charities USA

           http://www.catholiccharitiesusa.org/

     Catholic Peace Fellowship

           http://www.catholicpeacefellowship.org/

     Catholic Relief Services

           http://www.catholicrelief.org/

     Catholic Relief Services Campus Connection

           http://www.crscampusconnection.org/

     Catholic Worker

           http://www.catholicworker.org/

     Center of Concern

           http://www.coc.org/

     Houston Catholic Worker/Casa Juan Diego

           http://www.cjd.org/

     Iowa Catholic Conference

           http://www.iowacatholicconference.org/

     National Catholic Rural Life Conference

           http://www.ncrlc.com/

     Network

           http://www/networklobby.org

     Pax Christi USA

           http://www.paxchristiusa.org

     The Acton Institute for the Study of Religion and Liberty

                http://www.acton.org/

     Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace

           http://www.justpax.it/

     United States Conference of Catholic Bishops,

     Department of Social Development and World Peace

           http://www.usccb.org/sdwp/index.htm

 

Campaigns

Catholic Campaign against Global Poverty

http://www.catholicrelief.org/globalpoverty

Catholic Campaign to End the Use of the Death Penalty

http://www.ccedp.org/

Catholic Campaign for Immigration reform

http://www.justiceforimmigrants.org/

Catholic Campaign for Peace in the Holy Land

http://www.usccb.org/sdwp/international/holylandpeace.htm